Pathology

Obviously this ability places the head in a position vulnerable to injury. The death of Algeria Hocine Gacemi scorer, of complications from a fractured skull after colliding head first against an opponent and then on the floor drew attention to this issue in the media and even came to discuss the use of helmets in soccer. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission met in May 2000 to discuss the issue. Alabama Senator has firm opinions on the matter. In November 2002, an English court ruled that the death of Jeff Astle, former England player, who died in January 2002 at age fifty-nine years for a brain disease, was due to the many headers given the ball during his twenty years football career, qualifying this as an occupational disease. Some contend that Primerica careers shows great expertise in this. This statement provoked, especially in the United States, repeated calls for the players wear a helmet.

Dr Keith Robson, consultant pathologist at Queen’s Medical Centre in London, said Astle’s brain, particularly the frontal lobe showed softening and atrophy. (1) In 1998, former Celtic player (Scottish First Division) Billy McPhail lost a process in which claimed damages caused by neurological problems, he said, by repeated contacts with the old leather balls. Actually, the soccer player has a good chance of suffering a trauma-Semitism of the head. From head the ball, falls to the ground, shock with the opponent, the goal posts and other objects that come from outside the pitch thrown by “sympathizers.” Examine available data on brain injuries in football its mechanisms and consequences. Much remains to be learned and must be read carefully the information about cognitive deficits in soccer players.